+-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

 

Donate

 

 

 SuperMom Anyone that donates recieves this special badge! Be sure to add a note with your screen name to have this badge added to your account. 


All donations go to help keep the site running, maintained, and to adding new features. Donations are NOT required but are greatly appreciated. 

Author Topic: DS is "graduating" from home therapies  (Read 200 times)

Ocuw9i

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • Referrals: 0
DS is "graduating" from home therapies
« on: June 07, 2018, 12:35:59 pm »
I know that's not a great word for it. One of the workers on his team quit and last week was her final session with us. I was asked if I just wanted to forgo those sessions and told at any time I could decide he'd gotten enough help. I know the person on his case who just left said he's the most high functioning kid she's ever worked with. The have him an inclusion (mainsteam) classroom this year. The school said no to him having a one on one aide during the transition, and his teacher really has had a hard  time with him in her class without any back up. So guess I have to decide what to do without anyone really making professional recommendations.

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter


Shadow_lark

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1080
  • Karma: +4/-1
  • Referrals: 0
Re: DS is "graduating" from home therapies
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2018, 01:12:57 pm »
Do you think he will be ok in that kind of classroom setting? I've found that with schools you have to be the advocate. They aren't going to stretch their necks out for you. Know what he is entitled to and then go to them with a proposal of what you think would be best.

Reaandiziesmama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 219
  • Karma: +4/-1
  • Referrals: 0
What diagnosis/needs does he have?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk


Ocuw9i

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: DS is "graduating" from home therapies
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2018, 10:18:19 pm »
I don't know. There's been a couple times his teacher's seemed a little overwhelmed by him, but she's assured me he is by far not one of the kids who takes up the most of his time. He just not independent, so he doesn't do his classwork sometimes, and a lot of his classwork gets sent home undone. I do make him do it at home, but he needs a lot of reminders to start working, keep working, and not stop working. And he needs frequent rewards and breaks. His teacher's also said he shuts down when he's being inflexible. But I get the impression her students that are a bigger time sink have behavior problems. DS gets distracted easily, and shuts down occasionally, but he's quiet, polite, and not disruptive.
Do you think he will be ok in that kind of classroom setting? I've found that with schools you have to be the advocate. They aren't going to stretch their necks out for you. Know what he is entitled to and then go to them with a proposal of what you think would be best.

Ocuw9i

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • Referrals: 0
He meets the educational criteria for autism. He was born three months early, so we knew he was at risk when he was born.
What diagnosis/needs does he have?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk

Reaandiziesmama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 219
  • Karma: +4/-1
  • Referrals: 0
I have the opposite. My ds meets the behaviour criteria but not the educational. He get schooled outside of district due to his behavior. It seems like if kids don't tick both educational and behavior boxes the get ignored
He meets the educational criteria for autism. He was born three months early, so we knew he was at risk when he was born.
What diagnosis/needs does he have?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk


Ocuw9i

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • Referrals: 0
He was a behavior problem when he first started in special day class. But he was nonverbal and would just often drop to the ground tantruming because nobody could read his mind.
I have the opposite. My ds meets the behaviour criteria but not the educational. He get schooled outside of district due to his behavior. It seems like if kids don't tick both educational and behavior boxes the get ignored
He meets the educational criteria for autism. He was born three months early, so we knew he was at risk when he was born.
What diagnosis/needs does he have?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: June 07, 2018, 11:05:11 pm by Ocuw9i »

Reaandiziesmama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 219
  • Karma: +4/-1
  • Referrals: 0
He was a behavior problem when he first started in special day class. But he was nonverbal and would just often drop to the ground tantruming because nobody could read his mind.
I have the opposite. My ds meets the behaviour criteria but not the educational. He get schooled outside of district due to his behavior. It seems like if kids don't tick both educational and behavior boxes the get ignored
He meets the educational criteria for autism. He was born three months early, so we knew he was at risk when he was born.
What diagnosis/needs does he have?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk
What's his needs now? Is he verbal? Conversational?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk


Ocuw9i

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • Referrals: 0
He's doing much better now. It may just be that they all worked themselves out of a job. He started to read before he talked, which was weird but his speech therapist said was more common than I'd think. So they were able to use text prompts with him, and that helped a lot. A year ago we hadn't had our first conversation with him, but now it's completely different. He still has some trouble getting out what he's trying to say, but no more than I'd expect from a kiddo with mild speech issues. He'll be seven in five months and my four year old is still better at telling us what's happened to her or what she's excited about. But a year ago, DH would have freaked at the thought of ending his home therapies. Being able to have conversations with his son has totally made the difference there.

So, as for your boy: Is he being bussed to a school that can better meet his needs? Or is it just that you were unable to get him help in district because they kept citing his behavior?
He was a behavior problem when he first started in special day class. But he was nonverbal and would just often drop to the ground tantruming because nobody could read his mind.
I have the opposite. My ds meets the behaviour criteria but not the educational. He get schooled outside of district due to his behavior. It seems like if kids don't tick both educational and behavior boxes the get ignored
He meets the educational criteria for autism. He was born three months early, so we knew he was at risk when he was born.
What diagnosis/needs does he have?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk
What's his needs now? Is he verbal? Conversational?

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: June 08, 2018, 06:53:29 am by Ocuw9i »

Reaandiziesmama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 219
  • Karma: +4/-1
  • Referrals: 0
We live in a very small town. The only an classes they have here are geared for kids that have down syndrome or learning disabilities. They have no place for kids with behavior issues. So they opted to place him outside. It's been great for him. Classes less than 12 kids to two teachers. School work to ability not grade level. Counseling.  All the therapies he needs.

I'm sorry if I sounded judgemental. Was just trying to get an idea of your situation to offer advise.

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk


Ocuw9i

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Lol, no way. You didn't sound judgmental at all. I[
am sorry if I came out sounding defensive. I really was curious. Because we hired an i.e.p. advocate before, and she had talked about how extreme it was to send a kiddo out of district. But I knew my son went to school with kids bussed in from out  of district. So I know it happens, just hadn't had the opportunity to hear from a parent why that happened.

I hadn't thought about it, but my son was initially placed in a special day class that had two kids with DS there as well. But after he started talking, he was placed in a class that only had one child with Down's Syndrome. Last year there was children with different challenges in his class, but no children with Down's Syndrome. One of the kids had visual impairment and two had hearing impairment, and one was DS's friend who I knew had the same diagnosis as him. She had some challenging behaviors that could get a bit violent. I actually felt like the school wasn't doing enough for her. DS visited the inclusion class often last year, but she only visited that class two thirty minute blocks a week. She was very intelligent, a better worker, and much more verbal than my son. But she would have needed a 1:1 aide to help her navigate social situations. ("Instead of sitting on him, how can you ask him to play with you?") So, I don't know if our school district is the best at dealing with behavioral issues, either.
   
We live in a very small town. The only an classes they have here are geared for kids that have down syndrome or learning disabilities. They have no place for kids with behavior issues. So they opted to place him outside. It's been great for him. Classes less than 12 kids to two teachers. School work to ability not grade level. Counseling.  All the therapies he needs.

I'm sorry if I sounded judgemental. Was just trying to get an idea of your situation to offer advise.

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk

Reaandiziesmama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 219
  • Karma: +4/-1
  • Referrals: 0
Lol, no way. You didn't sound judgmental at all. I[
am sorry if I came out sounding defensive. I really was curious. Because we hired an i.e.p. advocate before, and she had talked about how extreme it was to send a kiddo out of district. But I knew my son went to school with kids bussed in from out  of district. So I know it happens, just hadn't had the opportunity to hear from a parent why that happened.

I hadn't thought about it, but my son was initially placed in a special day class that had two kids with DS there as well. But after he started talking, he was placed in a class that only had one child with Down's Syndrome. Last year there was children with different challenges in his class, but no children with Down's Syndrome. One of the kids had visual impairment and two had hearing impairment, and one was DS's friend who I knew had the same diagnosis as him. She had some challenging behaviors that could get a bit violent. I actually felt like the school wasn't doing enough for her. DS visited the inclusion class often last year, but she only visited that class two thirty minute blocks a week. She was very intelligent, a better worker, and much more verbal than my son. But she would have needed a 1:1 aide to help her navigate social situations. ("Instead of sitting on him, how can you ask him to play with you?") So, I don't know if our school district is the best at dealing with behavioral issues, either.
   
We live in a very small town. The only an classes they have here are geared for kids that have down syndrome or learning disabilities. They have no place for kids with behavior issues. So they opted to place him outside. It's been great for him. Classes less than 12 kids to two teachers. School work to ability not grade level. Counseling.  All the therapies he needs.

I'm sorry if I sounded judgemental. Was just trying to get an idea of your situation to offer advise.

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk
Yeah. Izaak was a runner is the mainstream class.  They didn't offer a 1:1 because he didn't qualify for an iep except for speech. Their solution was to stick him in the hs iss room and when he acted out send him home. He's doing better now. On many meds.

Let me clarify I have a soft spot and LOVE KIDS with ds. I have a cousin whom I adore with ds. But sometimes I think it's easier to get help for kids with physical signs of sn.  You look at ds and talk to him in meds you would think I'm seeking issues for attention. I'm not.

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk


PiscesFishy

  • SuperMom
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1522
  • Karma: +31/-0
  • Referrals: 0
Re: DS is "graduating" from home therapies
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2018, 11:35:51 pm »
I don't know. There's been a couple times his teacher's seemed a little overwhelmed by him, but she's assured me he is by far not one of the kids who takes up the most of his time. He just not independent, so he doesn't do his classwork sometimes, and a lot of his classwork gets sent home undone. I do make him do it at home, but he needs a lot of reminders to start working, keep working, and not stop working. And he needs frequent rewards and breaks. His teacher's also said he shuts down when he's being inflexible. But I get the impression her students that are a bigger time sink have behavior problems. DS gets distracted easily, and shuts down occasionally, but he's quiet, polite, and not disruptive.
Do you think he will be ok in that kind of classroom setting? I've found that with schools you have to be the advocate. They aren't going to stretch their necks out for you. Know what he is entitled to and then go to them with a proposal of what you think would be best.


It sounds to me like he needs an aide. Just an extra person to gently nudge him to stay on track. At the very least they could try taking him out for resources.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2018, 11:37:51 pm by PiscesFishy »

Ocuw9i

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 510
  • Karma: +2/-0
  • Referrals: 0
I didn't think you had any adversion to people with Down's Syndrome. Lol, we are having a dicey conversation with no tone or inflection. That's always rough.

I just know what you meant about meeting the kiddo's educational needs based on ability. I was thinking of DS's friend. She is so bright. I just couldn't see classroom instruction worth her time if she was in a class meeting the abilities of that first class DS was in, with the nonverbal and lower functioning kids.
Lol, no way. You didn't sound judgmental at all. I[
am sorry if I came out sounding defensive. I really was curious. Because we hired an i.e.p. advocate before, and she had talked about how extreme it was to send a kiddo out of district. But I knew my son went to school with kids bussed in from out  of district. So I know it happens, just hadn't had the opportunity to hear from a parent why that happened.

I hadn't thought about it, but my son was initially placed in a special day class that had two kids with DS there as well. But after he started talking, he was placed in a class that only had one child with Down's Syndrome. Last year there was children with different challenges in his class, but no children with Down's Syndrome. One of the kids had visual impairment and two had hearing impairment, and one was DS's friend who I knew had the same diagnosis as him. She had some challenging behaviors that could get a bit violent. I actually felt like the school wasn't doing enough for her. DS visited the inclusion class often last year, but she only visited that class two thirty minute blocks a week. She was very intelligent, a better worker, and much more verbal than my son. But she would have needed a 1:1 aide to help her navigate social situations. ("Instead of sitting on him, how can you ask him to play with you?") So, I don't know if our school district is the best at dealing with behavioral issues, either.
   
We live in a very small town. The only an classes they have here are geared for kids that have down syndrome or learning disabilities. They have no place for kids with behavior issues. So they opted to place him outside. It's been great for him. Classes less than 12 kids to two teachers. School work to ability not grade level. Counseling.  All the therapies he needs.

I'm sorry if I sounded judgemental. Was just trying to get an idea of your situation to offer advise.

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk
Yeah. Izaak was a runner is the mainstream class.  They didn't offer a 1:1 because he didn't qualify for an iep except for speech. Their solution was to stick him in the hs iss room and when he acted out send him home. He's doing better now. On many meds.

Let me clarify I have a soft spot and LOVE KIDS with ds. I have a cousin whom I adore with ds. But sometimes I think it's easier to get help for kids with physical signs of sn.  You look at ds and talk to him in meds you would think I'm seeking issues for attention. I'm not.

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk

Reaandiziesmama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 219
  • Karma: +4/-1
  • Referrals: 0
Ibwasnt worried about you so much as a random person reading my post.

It's just so hard

Sent from my SM-S737TL using Tapatalk


 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
77 Replies
1688 Views
Last post March 12, 2019, 01:06:06 pm
by Momof337
1 Replies
94 Views
Last post May 25, 2018, 11:14:29 pm
by motherlounge
3 Replies
83 Views
Last post June 09, 2018, 11:09:49 am
by anonymous
27 Replies
255 Views
Last post June 29, 2018, 07:53:47 pm
by Velvetfog
13 Replies
172 Views
Last post June 19, 2018, 06:29:09 am
by TheRealMe

+- Recent Comments

So, it's dead by anlei05
November 18, 2019, 11:35:54 pm

i get it times have changed by LuckyEightWow
November 10, 2019, 04:11:43 pm

death by Akmom25
October 06, 2019, 03:28:21 am

I agree by WickedLauraBelle
October 03, 2019, 02:12:25 pm

Where's Cafemom when you need it? by Ocuw9i
September 24, 2019, 11:53:11 am

Our Sister Sites

www.momconfessions.net

MomFriends